GLOSSARY

If you’re confused by theme park, thrill ride and roller coaster terminology, our handy glossary of terms will help you out!

For coaster inversion definitions, such as loops and corkscrews, please see our Inversions page.

Our Coaster Types section has information on different ride types and our Manufacturer section has what you need to know about who makes them.

#, A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q, R, S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z

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4th Dimension
As referred to as a 4D Coaster, it’s a type of roller coaster where the seats are capable of forward and backward twists via an additional two rails attached to a ratchet gear on the train and is capable of flipping its seats during any element. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
180° Inversion
Also known as an Inverted Top Hat, this element is entered vertically before twisting under at the top and exiting vertically while twisting out again. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
180° Roll
An element on flying coasters where the riders are turned from being in a face-up position to one which faces downward, or vice-versa. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.

A

Accelerator Coaster
Intamin‘s term for a hydraulic launch coaster. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Air Force
Zamperla‘s suspended kiddie coaster. Further information can be found on our Manufaturer page.
Air Gate
A controlled gate on the loading platform that prevents riders from walking onto the train or car.
Air Powered Launch
Often referred to as Thrust Air Launch, it’s when the train is launched using compressed air. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Airtime
The coming-out-of-your-seat sensation caused by a change in G-force, usually experienced when the train travels over hills or down drops.
Airtime Hill
A hill that provides riders with a coming-out-of-your-seat sensation caused by a change in G-force as the train travels over the crest or down the drop. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Alpine Coaster
Sometimes called Mountain Coasters, they are similar to, and were inspired by, bobsled coasters, but use rails instead of a trough as track. Unlike a roller coaster, riders control the speed of the sled using break levers. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Amusement Park
A park with many attractions for people of all ages but generally has no themed areas.
Anaconda
Preston & Barbieri’s modern version of a wildcat coaster. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
Anti-Rollback Device
Safety device that stops the train from rolling back down the lift hill. The clicking sound heard on most lift hills is the Anti-Rollback Device working. Often referred to as a chain dog.
Aqua Trax
Intamin‘s LSM launched coaster that features a variety of water interactions and effects. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Arrow
An abbreviation of Arrow Dynamics, that was originally called Arrow Development from 1945-1981 and Arrow-Huss from 1981-1984. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
Axis Coaster
A S&S suspended coaster that incorporates their 4D rotating vehicle technology used on their free spin coasters and uses the track design to control how the seats rotate. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.

B

B&M
The common name for Bolliger & Mabillard, that’s been in business since 1988. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
Bag Lady
CoasterForce term to describe somebody who looks after the bags whilst other people go on a ride.
Ball Coaster
See Zac Spin.
Banana Roll
An element named after its shape that looks like an elongated cobra roll. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Banked Curve or Turn
A type of track where it’s tilted while turning to reduce the lateral G-forces on riders. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Barrel Roll
Also known as a heartline roll, this element is designed to have the track twist 360° around the train with the axis of rotation centered on the rider, usually at chest level. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Barrel Roll Downdrop
An element found on RMC coasters where the train  goes through a Barrel Roll (above) as it begins decent down the first drop. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Basic
An entry level theme park and roller coaster enthusiast. A “goon” who hasn’t visited a wide variety of theme parks or been on many ride types.
Batflyer
Dutch manufacturer Caripro’s single-seater suspended family coaster. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Batwing
An element often used on the B&M Inverted Coasters, it’s comprised of a mini-dive loop running straight into a mini-Immelmann. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Bents
The vertical wood beams on a wooden roller coaster‘s support structure.
Beyond Vertical Drop
As the name suggests, it’s a drop that is greater than 90°. Gerstlauer Euro-Fighters feature beyond vertical first drops.
Big Apple
Also know as a Caterpillar or Wacky Worm, these kiddie coasters have a figure 8 layout and feature caterpillar themed trains.
Big Boy Seat
A seat on a ride specifically designed to accommodate a larger than average sized person.
BigDipper
Mack Ride‘s version of a wing coaster, however the cars have only two rows of seats, which allows the coaster to feature compact inversions. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Blitz Coaster
These Intamin coasters feature multiple LSM launches and inversions, as well as custom layouts. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Block
A section of track where only one train can enter (used on coasters that have more than one train).
Block Brakes
Used to stop a train from entering the next block (above) if another train occupies that block.
Blousing Out
CoasterForce term to describe somebody who refuses to ride because they are scared or ill.
Bobsled Coaster
A roller coaster where the train coasts down a trench, similar to that of a winter bobsleigh. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Bogie
The chassis of a coaster car.
Boomerang Coaster
A Vekoma roller coaster where the train travels forward, briefly stops and then goes backward along the same track. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Booster Wheels
Also known as Drive Tires or Friction Wheels, these are motorized wheels between the rails that propel the train along a section of track. Usually found in the station and brake runs. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Bowtie
An Arrow element shaped like a Bowtie, that’s similar to their double sidewinder/batwing (above) inversion, except the train exits in the same direction as it enters. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Brake Fins
A straight piece of steel found on the underside of the coaster car that slides into and through a brake mounted on the tracks or thin electromagnetic strips in the center of the track that slow the train down without making contact with the train.
Brake Run
A stretch of flat track with brakes installed that slow or stop the train that are located before the train entrance to the station and are used to control loading and dispatching of the trains. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Breakdown
When a ride stops due to mechanical or technical issues.
Brakeman
A coaster operator who rides on the train and uses a lever to manually operate the brakes as it travels the circuit and to stop it upon returning to the station.
Bunny Hops
A series of small, short hills, that usually appear towards the end of the circuit, designed to induce brief bursts of airtime. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Butterfly
An element featured on Vekoma Multi-Loopers that’s basically an Immelmann followed by a Dive Loop where the train leaves in the same direction as it enters. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Butterfly Coaster
A self-operated ride where a single car with up to two riders is pulled to the top of a small U-shaped track and then released to travel back and forth until coming to a stop again. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Buzz Bars
Single-position lap bars on wooden coasters that were given the name for the buzzing sound that the bars on PTC (Philadelphia Toboggan Company) trains make as they lock or release.

C

Camelback
Shaped like the dromedary’s hump, it’s a medium to large airtime hill or often a series of two or more hills. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Capacity
The number of riders an attraction can accommodate (usually measured in riders-per-hour).
Caripro
A Dutch manufacturer that built family-friendly suspended coasters from 1997-2001.
Car
An individual section of a train defined by seats on their own set of wheels. A roller coaster train is made up of several cars joined together. Many coasters don’t use trains, just individual cars.
Caterpillar
Also know as a Big Apple or Wacky Worm, these kiddie coasters have a figure 8 layout and feature caterpillar themed trains.
Catapult
A launch coaster where the train zooms out from the station without the aid of a lift hill or booster wheels. Further information about launches can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Catch Car
A steel framework that is used on Boomerang, as well a a few other coaster types, to pull the train up the lift hill.
Cattlepen
Where a queue line is laid out in tightly packed rows next to one another.
CCI
An abbreviation of Custom Coasters International, a wooden coaster company that went out of business in 2002. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
Centrifugal Force
Another term for Lateral Gs.
CF-Live
CoasterForce Live – An official meeting of CoasterForce members at a theme park.
Chain Dog
A metal catch device beneath the train cars (above) which engages into the moving chain lift in order to pull the train uphill. Also known as an Anti-Rollback Device.
Chain Lift
A lift hill where the train reaches the top using a ratchet and chain system. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Chance
An abbreviation of Chance Rides, which started as Chance Manufacturing in 1961 before acquiring Morgan Manufacturing in 2001. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
Chutes
The semicircular shaped troughs that Bobsled coasters travel through.
Circuit
The term used for a complete lap of a roller coaster – from station back to station.
Clone
A roller coaster that has the exact same layout as another roller coaster.
Clothoid Loop
A teardrop shaped vertical loop.
Coaster Count
The number of different roller coasters an enthusiast has ridden.
Cobra Roll
Its Cobra head shape gives the element its name and it’s very similar to an Immelmann followed by a dive loop, however the dive out of the half loop is not as big. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Corkscrew
Named for its resemblance to the tool used to remove corks from bottles, the corkscrew is an inversion that rotates 360° perpendicular to the track and is found on hundreds of coasters the world over. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Credit
A “Cred” is roller coaster on an enthusiast’s Coaster Count (above).
Cred Anxiety
When you visit a park with loads of new-to-you coasters and worry that you won’t be able to ride them all before the park shuts. Commonly associated with one-day visits to large parks like Six Flags Magic Mountain or Cedar Point.
Cred in a Shed
CoasterForce term for a indoor roller coaster that lacks any type of theme or visual effects.
Credit Whore
CoasterForce term describing an enthusiast who will ride any roller coaster. A Cred Whore will go to extreme lengths to obtain the cred (above).
Crossover
A section of roller coaster track that crosses above or under another section. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Cutback
An element similar to a Corkscrew (above), except the second-half of the element is reversed so the train exits the element in the opposite direction from which it entered. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.

D

Dark Ride
A ride inside a building usually containing different themed sections. Many Dark Rides have interactive shooting elements and keep track of the riders’ scores. These Dark Rides are sometimes referred to as “Dark Shooters”.
Dive Coaster
Originally referred to as a Dive Machine, it’s a B&M roller coaster where the car is held at the top of a vertical (or near vertical) drop before being released. Other manufacturers have since designed their own version of the coaster. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Dive Drop
Also referred to as a Wing Over Drop, it’s an element most often found on B&M wing coasters that flips riders upside down on the first drop. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Dive Loop
An element very similar to the Immelmann, but executed in reverse. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Double Down
A drop that is immediately followed by a second drop. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Double Figure Eight
A type of roller coaster track layout that resembles two figure eights that are side-by-side.
Double Inverting Stall
A rare RMC I-Box conversion element that twists the train 270° and remains in that position for few seconds before reverse twisting 270° back to normal. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Double Out and Back
An out and back coaster whose track follows a similar route for a second time.
Double Up
A hill that starts to crest but flattens out and ascends again. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Double Sidewinder
Arrow and Vekoma’s version of a batwing. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Drive Tires
Also known as Booster or Friction Wheels, these are motorized wheels between the rails that propel the train along a section of track. Usually found in the station and brake runs. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Dual Station
A ride station that can accommodate two trains or cars with separate track loading for each. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Dueling Coaster
Two roller coasters that are built in close proximity to one another. The two layouts interact so riders on each coaster experience near misses or racing elements. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.

E

E&F Miler
Originally known as Miler Manufacturing from the late 1940’s through the ’70s, then again from 1989-1992 before changing to Miler Coaster, Inc. from 1992-2012. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
E-Motion
Cars on Mack Rides‘ E-Motion coasters have a spring suspension that causes it to rock and shake in multiple directions. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
E-Stop
An abbreviation for ‘Emergency Stop’. When a ride is stopped by ride ops or safety mechanisms. The ride may start again shortly after, or remain closed for a longer period of time, depending on the severity of the incident that caused the E-Stop.
E-Vac
Also know as an Evacuation, it’s when riders are forced to depart the train whist on the circuit due to a mechanical or safety mechanism failure. Usually preceded by an E-Stop (above).
Element
A feature in a roller coaster layout, i.e. Inversions are Elements. Further information can be found on our Elements and Inversions pages.
Ejector
A type of airtime that abruptly lifts riders out of their seat for a second or two before dropping them back into their seat.
Elevated Curve
A type of banked curve where the track either descends or ascends as it curves. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Enclosed
A roller coaster or ride inside a building.
Enthusiast
A person who is very interested in roller coasters. Affectionately called a “Goon” or “Thoosie” by fellow enthusiasts.
ESC
An abbreviation of Elevated Seating Coaster, Zierer‘s popular family coasters. Further information can be found of our Manufacturer page.
ERT
Exclusive Ride Time. A period of time where members of a group have exclusive use of a roller coaster or flat ride, usually outside of normal park operating hours. Also known as ERS – Exclusive Ride Session.
Euro-Fighter
A Gerstlauer designed type of dive coaster that features a vertical lift hill, a beyond vertical first drop and at least one inversion. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Evacuation
Also know as an E-Vac, it’s when riders are forced to depart the train whist on the circuit due to a mechanical or safety mechanism failure. Usually preceded by an E-Stop (above).

F

Fabbri
An Italian amusement ride manufacturer that was founded in 1950, specializing in Ferris Wheel and spinning Wild Mouse coaster production.
Faff
CoasterForce term describing unnecessary time wasting.
Family Boomerang
Sometimes referred to as a Junior Boomerang, it’s Vekoma‘s smaller variation of their Boomerang that doesn’t invert. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Family Coaster
A roller coaster suitable for pre-teens and those that don’t like or are not used to intense rides.
Fan Curve
Often found on wooden coasters, it’s a curve with spoke reinforcements radiating from a central point to the circumference of the track. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Fanboy/Fangirl
Roller coaster/theme park enthusiast’s term to describe somebody who is obsessed with a certain ride or a park.
Fastpass
A special ticket that allows a rider to bypass a queue line. Also see “Q-Bot”.
Fat Boat
CoasterForce term for a log flume boat full of large people in order to create an extra large splash at the bottom of a drop.
Figure Eight
A section of track that resembles the number 8 when viewed from above. Two 180° turns in opposite directions connected with a crossover.
Final Brake Run
The last brake run on a roller coaster that slows down or stops a train before it re-enters the station or loading platform.
First Drop
Typically the first thrill element of a traditional roller coaster. The big drop immediately after the lift hill or launch.
Flat Ride
A thrill ride that is not a roller coaster or water ride. Occasionally referred to as a ‘flat’.
Flat Spin
A term coined by B&M to describe their banked, high-speed helix turns on their sit-down and standup coasters.
Flat Turn
A non-banked turn where the track remains flat and gives the sensation that the car might tip over due to the lateral G-forces. Flat Turns are featured on every wild mouse coaster.
Flitzer
Zierer‘s first coaster. They feature bullet shaped cars and low upward and downward spiral track layouts. Further information can be found of our Manufacturer page.
Floater
A type of airtime that gently lifts riders out of their seat for a few seconds before softly lowering them back into their seat.
Flojector
CoasterForce term for that airtime that is a bit too strong to be floater but not quite spine-separating ejector. It can take many guises – from a sudden aggressive pop of floater (above) to a gradual build-up of ejector. One of those things where “you know when you feel it”, and boy does it feel good!
Floorless Coaster
A roller coaster where the train sits above the track but does not have a floor. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Fluid Swing Coaster
Setpoint‘s family friendly suspended coasters. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Fly-By
The section on dueling coasters where two trains race towards one another, only to pass by each other at the last moment. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Fly Through
Where the train passes through the station at high speed, however this is on a separate section of track not used for loading and unloading.
Fly-To-Lie
An element on flying coasters where the riders are turned from being in a face-down position to one which faces upward. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Flying Coaster
A roller coaster where the train runs beneath the track and the seats reposition themselves so riders are in a “Superman” flying position. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Flying Dutchman
Vekoma‘s version of a flying coaster (above). Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Flying Turns
First introduced in the 1920’s, these were the forerunners to bobsled coasters where low-slung trains wove their way through concave troughs made from wood instead of track. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Flying Snake Dive
It’s a very tall heartline roll followed by a right hand twisting dive to spin the train off to the left. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Flywheel Launch
Found on Schwarzkopf catapult coasters, this type of launch system uses a large metal flywheel that rotates and a clutch then engages a drum with a launch cable wrapped around it, which itself is connected to a “pusher”, that propels the train down the track to a preset speed.
Footchoppers
Where a rider feels like their feet are going to hit something.
Fourth Dimention
See 4th Dimension above.
Free Fall Coaster
Intamin‘s Reverse Free Fall Coaster, except the car launches up the vertical spike backwards and drops back down facing forwards. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Free Fly Coaster
A row of bench seats is suspended below each wing and can freely rotate 360° on this S&S coaster as it travels along the track. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Free Spin Coaster
Manufactured by S&S, it’s the company’s version of a 4D coaster and features spinning wing seats similar to its Intamin counterpart. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Friction Wheels
Also known as Booster Wheels or Drive Tires, these are motorized wheels between the rails that propel the train along a section of track. Usually found in the station and brake runs. Further information can be found on our Elements page.

G

G-Force
The forces on the body experienced by a rider as the train or car moves. The variants of G-Force experienced during a ride depends on the element. Further information can be found on our G-Forces page.
Galaxi
Former Italian amusement ride company S.D.C.’s non-inverting Wildcat/non-inverting Zyklon clone.
GCI
An abbreviation of Great Coasters International, the wooden coaster company in business since 1994. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
GIB
An abbreviation of Giant Inverted Boomerang, Vekoma‘s larger version of it’s Invertigo coaster. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Giga Coaster
A coaster over 300 feet (91.5m) in height, but not over 400 feet (122m) tall. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Giovanola
An abbreviation of Giovanola Frères SA, the former Swiss steel manufacturing company founded in 1888 that entered the amusement ride market in the 1980’s serving as a subcontractor to Intamin, providing structural steel and parts for its roller coasters, freefall towers and swinging pirate ships. In 1987 the company’s top two engineers, Walter Bolliger and Claude Mabillard, formed their own company (B&M) and Giovanola folded in 2004.
Goon
CoasterForce term to describe somebody who has an over-enthusiastic and special love affair with roller coasters and theme parks. They eat, sleep, breathe theme parks and coasters. Typically geeky, but “goon” can be used to describe any level of theme park interest.
Gooniform
Theme park and ride branded apparel worn by a goon (above).
GP
An abbreviation of General Public, which is a slightly derogatory term enthusiasts use to refer to non-enthusiasts who visit amusement parks.
Grab Bars
The handles on the front or side of the seats for riders to hold on to while riding.
Gravity Group
An abbreviation of The Gravity Group, the wooden coaster design company founded in 2002. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
Gravitykraft
An abbreviation of Gravitykraft Corporation, Gravity Group’s train and track manufacturing branch.
Guide Wheels
Wheels attached to the bottom of the train that run under or to the side of the track, fixing the train to the track and enabling the train to glide around turns. Further information can be found on our Trains page.

H

Half Pipe
A non-inverted shuttle coaster that travels back and forth along a compact upright U-shaped track. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Hammerhead
Based on a flying maneuver by the same name, it’s similar to a high 180° banked turn. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Head Chopper
The part of a roller coaster as it narrowly enters a tunnel or goes through or under another structure, creating the illusion that the rider might hit their head.
Heartline Roll
Also known as a barrel roll, this element is designed to have the track twist 360° around the train with the axis of rotation centered on the rider, usually at chest level. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Helix
A balanced spiral track, generally exceeding 360°. Helices can spiral upward or downward. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
High Five
Found on dueling coasters, both of the dueling tracks are banked 90° so that raised hands of the riders in one train appear to touch those of riders in the other train as they pass. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Holding Brake
This is used just before the first drop on a dive coaster where the car is held at the cusp of the vertical drop for a few seconds before being released. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Home Park
The park closest to, or most visited by, a coaster enthusiast. May or may not invoke fanboy-ism.
Hopkins
An abbreviation of Hopkins Rides, who built seven roller coasters between 1985-1996. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
Horse Collar
A type of Vekoma and Arrow restraint used on inverting coasters that pulls down over the head and shoulders, locking in position over the chest. Also known as “Ear” or “Head Bangers”.
Horseshoe
It’s essentially a 180° turnaround with high banking so that riders are tilted at a 90° angle or more at the top at the turn. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Hybrid
A roller coaster made using both wood and steel materials. A wooden hybrid coaster has a steel support structure and wooden track, whilst a steel hybrid coaster has a wooden support structure with steel track.
Hydraulic Launch
A type of launch that uses compressed nitrogen gas and hydraulic fluid to launch a train at very high acceleration rates from a standstill. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Hydraulic Launch Coaster
These coasters use a Hydraulic Launch (above) to propel the train to high speed in seconds. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Hyper Coaster
A term coined B&M for a roller coaster over 200 feet (61m), but not over 300 feet (91.5m) tall. Also see Mega Coaster.

I

I-Box Track
A type of steel roller coaster track created by RMC that allows old wooden coasters to be modified to include thrilling elements. Also known as “Iron Horse” track.
Immelmann
It’s the same as a vertical loop until the train is inverted (below), when the track dives off to the left or right. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Impulse Coaster
An Intamin (below) inverted LIM launch coaster with trains that launch forwards and backwards up a vertical spike or vertical spiral on a U-shaped track. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
In Storage
A roller coaster that has been disassembled, and is currently being stored for later use or parts.
Inclined Dive Loop
Similar to the Inclined Loop (below), this element is a dive loop tilted at a 45° angle. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Inclined Loop
It’s a vertical loop tilted at a 45° angle, that is featured almost entirely on B&M stand-up coasters. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Infinity Coaster
A variation of Gerstlaurer Euro-Fighter dive coasters. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Inline Twist
An inversion (below) that has little or no change in height and rotates the rider around a central point, often their hearts. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Intamin
An abbreviation of Intamin Amusement Rides, which was formerly known as Intamin AG when it was formed in 1967. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
Interlocking Loop
Where two vertical loops are placed within one another, like two links on a chain.
Inversion
An element on a roller coaster where the rider is turned upside down. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Inverted
Although the word means to be upside down, Inverted Coasters have trains that run underneath the track with seats attached directly to the wheel carriage and therefore the cars do not swing back and fourth like suspended coasters. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Inverted Top Hat
Also known as an 180° Inversion, this element is entered vertically before twisting under at the top and exiting vertically while twisting out again. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Invertigo
An inverted (above) roller coaster with the same track layout as a Boomerang. Also referred to as an Inverted Boomerang. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.

J

Jet Star
A Schwarzkopf compact traveling coaster from the 1970’s that features upward and downward spiral track layouts. The Jet Star 2 and Jumbo Jet models also feature a spiral lift. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
JoJo Roll
This element is when the coaster has a barrel roll/heartline roll right out of the station. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Junior Boomerang
See Family Boomerang.
Junior Coaster
A roller coaster designed specifically for pre-teens. A variation of a family coaster.
Junior Immelmann
Similar to a normal Immelmann, except riders are not inverted and roll 90° instead of 180°. Further information can be found on our Elements page.

K

Kiddie Coaster
A roller coaster designed specifically for very small children.

L

Lap Bar
A type of safety restraint. A bar that locks down over the rider’s lap.
L&T Systems
An Italian amusement ride manufacturer founded by former S.D.C. employees in 1997. They built 37 coasters, mostly Wild Mouse and kiddie coasters before Preston & Barbieri purchased all their designs in 2009, when L&T Systems went bankrupt.
Lateral Gs
The centrifugal forces which push, or even slam, riders to the side of the car and are usually found on flat turns.
Launch
Where a roller coaster train accelerates quickly, usually from a standstill.
Launch Cable
A reinforced steel cable used on hydraulic launch coasters to propel the train from standstill.
Layout
The path the track takes from the station back to the station.
Lie-To-Fly
An element on flying coasters where the riders are turned from being in a face-up position to one which faces downward. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Lift Hill
Inclined section of track at the start of the ride where the train is pulled or pushed to the highest point of the coaster by a chain, cable, drive tires or electromagnets.
LIM
An abbreviation of Linear Induction Motor. An induction motor operates with alternating current supplied directly to an electrical coil called a stator. If the rotor and stator are unrolled into a flat plane, the induction motor becomes a linear induction motor. An electrical current pulses through the “stator” creating an electro-magnetic force that pulls at aluminum fins attached to the bogie, creating forward motion that’s used to launch the train or boost it along the track.
Liquid Coaster
A water coaster designed by Premier Rides. Further information can be found of our Manufacturer page.
Loading Platform
The area of the station where riders board the train.
Log Flume
A ride where the riders sit in a boat and float along a trench filled with water.
Loop
See Vertical Loop.
LSM
An abbreviation of Linear Synchronous Motor. Strategically positioned electro-magnets are used to launch the train. LSM launch magnets switch attraction in perfect synchronization to achieve maximum acceleration. When the train approaches one of the track magnets (stator), it’s set to attract the rare-earth magnets on the train bogies, pulling the train forward. After the train passes over the stator, it’s reversed to repel the train magnet, pushing the cars down the track. The “switching on and off” is what separates the LSM from the LIM (above).

M

Mack
An abbreviation of Mack Rides Gmbh, the German coaster company that’s been in business since 1780. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
Mad Mouse
Arrow and Allan Herschell’s term for Wild Mouse. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Maurer
An abbreviation of Maurer Rides Gmbh, that originally was called Maurer Söhne from 1876-2014 and Maurer AG from 2014-2016. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
MCBR
An abbreviation of Mid-Course Brake Run (below).
Mega Coaster
A term coined by Intamin for a roller coaster over 200 feet (61m), but not over 300 feet (91.5m) tall. Also see Hyper Coaster.
Mid-Course Brake Run
A brake run partway through the circuit to either slow or stop the train. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Milestone
Reaching a significant number in your coaster count total. Typically 50 at first, then 100, 200, 300, etc.
Millennium Flyer
Roller coaster trains designed by GCI that are characterized by their cushioned seats, individual rider lap bars and a gate like frontage that often displays the ride logo. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
Mine Train
A type of coaster that resembles a mine train, often with a locomotive themed front car. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Möbius Coasters
Also known as Moebius Loop Coasters, it’s a roller coaster layout where two trains race one another on parallel tracks, but each train arrives on the opposite side of the station from which it departed. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Moto Coaster
Zamperla‘s version of Vekoma‘s Motorbike Coaster (below), that uses a flywheel launch and can be found themed with horses rather than motorcycles for guests to ride. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Motorbike Coaster
Vekoma‘s hydraulic launch coasters, that have motorcycles on the train cars for guests to ride. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Mountain Coaster
See Alpine Coaster.

N

Negative G’s
The airtime G-force that gives riders a feeling of weightlessness as they lift off their seats.
Non-Inverting Loop
A variety of vertical loop that, when ascending, twists similar to a heartline roll, leaving riders completely right-side-up at the top of the loop. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Norwegian Loop
Built by Intamin this element climbs rapidly, and then as it reaches the crest of the hill the train is inverted before completing three quarters of the loop to bring it back to the inverted position where it rolls out again. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.

O

ORP
An abbreviation of On Ride Photo, it’s an overpriced photo of riders on the attraction, usually taken by a strategically-placed fixed camera to ensure maximum grimaces. Can usually be bought at a booth near the ride exit.
OTSR
An abbreviation of Over The Shoulder Restraint, it’s a restraint that comes down over the head, sits flush to the riders shoulders and is usually doubly fastened by a seat belt.
Out and Back
A coaster layout where the track heads out away from the station, makes a turnaround, and returns near to the outbound track. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Overbanked Curve
Common on large steel coasters, it’s a curve in which the track tilts beyond 90° and is usually around 100-120°. Further information can be found on our Elements page.

P

Parking Lot Coaster
A roller coaster built above flat ground with no themeing, i.e. as if it was built on a car park or actually built upon a car park.
Pax
An abbreviation of Pax Company, a Russian amusement ride manufacturer established in 1988 specializing in Ferris Wheels and roller coasters, as well as drop towers and swinging pirate ships.
Pinfari
An Italian coaster manufacturer that was liquidated in July 2004 and before its brand and intellectual property were acquired three years later by Interpark, another Italian amusement ride company. Further information can be found on our Manufacturers page.
Pipeline Coaster
See Ultratwister.
Plug and Play Coaster
As referred to as Pre-Fab, it’s a wooden coaster designed by Intamin, where the coaster track and supports are pre-cut, pre-drilled and sent out “flat pack” to the park. It’s then assembled by engineers, who simply piece it together according to instructions.
POV
An abbreviation of Point of View. What the rider sees. Often used when describing front row view coaster videos. Watch roller coaster POVs on the CoasterForce YouTube channel.
Positive G’s
The G-forces that increase the gravitational force upon riders, pushing them down into their seats and felt most intensely at the bottom of a Pretzel Loop (below).
Portable Coaster
See Traveling Coaster.
Powered Coaster
A roller coaster that uses a powered motor to propel itself around the track.
Powersplash
Mack Rides‘ combination of a LSM shuttle coaster and water coaster with a U-shaped track featuring a small airtime hill and splash track between the two vertical spikes. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Pre-Drop
Sometimes called a Tester Hill or Trick Hill, it’s a small hill following the lift hill that precedes the first drop that is used to reduce the tension and stress on the lift mechanism prior to the train‘s release. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Pre-Fab
An abbreviation of Prefabrication, but more commonly know as Plug and Play (above).
Premier
An abbreviation of Premier Rides, the American coaster company formed in 1994. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
Preston & Barbieri
A small Italian coaster company that was formed in 1954. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
Pretzel Knot
It’s similar to a batwing, except the entrance and exit of the element is formed differently. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Pretzel Loop
An element exclusive to B&M flying coasters, that involves diving from the flying position head first towards the ground, then pulling out on your back, then back up and into the flying position. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
PTC
An abbreviation of Philadelphia Toboggan Company, a wooden coaster train manufacturer.

Q

Q-Bot
A service device that allows park guests to reserve a time slot to ride an attraction without having to wait in queue (below), usually at an additional cost.
Queue
The line of people waiting to ride an attraction or the area where people wait to ride, usually defined by stanchions forming a line.
Queue Jumper
Someone who thinks they do not have to wait in line and pushes past everybody, or jumps fences, to advance through the queue (above).

R

Racing Coaster
With two roller coaster tracks parallel to one another, both trains leave the station at the same time and race to the end of the ride. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Raptor
Raptor track is a smaller version of the single rail T-Rex track developed by RMC (below), using less steel and requiring less installation time and space. Due to the narrowness of Raptor compared to T-Rex track, riders sit in a single file formation. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
Ratchet
A toothed steel bar on a hill prevents the train from rolling backwards when the anti-rollback device attached under the car engages with it.
Raven Turn
An element found on Arrow/S&S 4D coasters, it’s basically a half loop and can be entered from the top or bottom with the train on top of the track (Outside Raven Turn) or suspended below the track (Inside Raven Turn). Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Restraint
A safety device to keep the rider secure in their seat.
Reverchon
A French roller coaster and water ride company that’s been in business since 1927 and specializes in spinning wild mouse coasters. Further information can be found on our Manufacturers page
Reverse Cobra Roll
Similar to a cobra roll, it’s basically two zero-g rolls with a banked turn in between so that the entrance and exit are both taken in the opposite direction. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Reverse Free Fall Coaster
Intamin‘s extremely tall hydraulic launch coaster where the train launches up a vertical spike and then plummets back down on the reverse journey back to the station. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Ride Op
An abbreviation of Ride Operator, so it’s the person or member of the team that operates the ride.
Riding Politely
CoasterForce term to describe a rider who sits with their hands clasped above their lap and has a nonchalant expression on their face.
RMC
An abbreviation of Rocky Mountain Construction, the ground breaking American coaster company formed in 2001. Further information can be found on our Manufacturers page.
Rocket Coaster
A seldom used term for launch coaster.
Roll Over
In this element the train enters through a half loop, into an inline twist and back down through a half loop. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Rollback
Happens when a launched coaster fails to overcome the first hill, and rolls back down the launch track. Safety mechanisms are put in place to slow the train down and prevent a collision with any trains behind. Rollbacks may be scary, but are perfectly safe.
Rolling Stock
A former term to describe a roller coaster train.

S

S&S
An abbreviation of S&S Sansei Technologies, that was originally known as S&S Power from 1994-1999 and S&S Worldwide from 2000-2012. Further information can be found on our Manufacturers page.
SBF VISA Group
An Italian amusement ride manufacturer that was founded in 1952 and became popular with their Tagada spinning rides that were popular at carnivals across the globe, other than the USA due to safety concerns. In recent years the company’s 360° Dance Party rotating pendulum rides have become quite popular, but nowhere near as much as their figure 8 spinning kiddie coasters. Further information about them can be found on our Coaster Types page.
SBNO
An abbreviation of Standing But Not Operating. A roller coaster that is not in use but remains intact.
S-Car
Maurer‘s specialized car for their spinning coasters (below). Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
S-Coaster
Maurer‘s term for their line of spinning coasters (below). Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Scenic Railway
Among the first roller coaster types in the 1800’s, these side friction coasters (below) often included “scenic” dioramas along the circuit. Further information can be found on our History timeline.
Schwarzkopf
The historic German roller coaster company that operated from to specialized in traveling models. Further information can be found on our Manufacturers page.
Scorpion Tail
An element found on the Pax Company’s Loop 520 coaster where the train travels around and up a 520° inversion before transversing it again backwards. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Sea Serpent
This element is very similar to a cobra roll, but the second inversion is flipped around, causing the direction of entrance to be the same as the direction of exit. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Seat Belt
A locking belt used to secure a restraint or fasten across the riders lap. Often used as a secondary fail safe to a ride’s primary restraint (such as lap bars or OTSRs).
Setpoint
An American amusement attraction company that created fluid swing coasters. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Shuttle Coaster
The launched roller coaster train travels in one direction, then travel backwards over the same track to return to the station (below).
Shuttle Loop Coaster
A popular Schwarzkopf (above) launch coaster that travels forwards and then backwards along the same track with a vertical loop and the station located between the two vertical spikes. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Side Friction Coaster
Before the invention of upstop wheels, coaster cars and trains weren’t attached to the track by anything other than gravity, so it’s any coaster where the car is essentially in a kind of trough, with wheels underneath and to the side. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Sidewinder
This element is basically a half-loop followed by a half-corkscrew and is is commonly found on Arrow and Vekoma coasters. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Sitting Coaster
A term loosely used for any coaster that has riders sitting in a train that travels above the tracks, but is also a specific B&M model that also has multiple inversions. Further information can be found on our Manufacturers page.
Skid Brake
An outdated brake system where the train wheels are lifted off the track by fixed wooden bars and friction between these and the base of the cars slows the train.
Sky Loop
This Maurer coaster is characterized by its vertical lift hill and its compact, vertical loop layout with a heartline roll at the top. Further information can be found on our Manufacturers page.
Sky Rocket II
Premier Rides‘ compact triple LSM launch coaster featuring a tall inlined loop and a smaller non-inverting loop. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
SLC
An abbreviation of Suspended Looping Coaster, Vekoma‘s popular multi-inverting coaster. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Speed Hill
Commonly found on B&M steel coasters and RMC hybrids, it’s a small hill entered at a high speed, which results in significant negative G-forces. Sometimes referred to as a Speed Bump.
Spike Coaster
Maurer‘s electrical powered motorbike coasters. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
Spinning Coaster
As the name would suggest, it’s a coaster that has cars that spin as they transverse the track. Also known as a “spinner”. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Spite
When something does not go the riders way. For example, when a ride is closed, a rider cannot get on a ride, an accident occurs or a group is split up when loading.
Spiral Lift
Unlike a chain or cable lift hill, this type of lift continuously curves upward before until reaching the highest point before the first drop. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Splash Party
Vekoma‘s version of Setpoint’s (above) interactive fluid swing coasters. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Splashdown
A visual element in which the ride vehicle physically interacts with a body of water, forcefully spraying or jetting water on impact. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Stall
When the coaster train doesn’t make it over the top of a hill due to external factors, such as wind or combined weight of the train and passengers.
Stand-Up Coaster
As the name would suggest, it’s a coaster that has cars where riders remain in a standing position throughout the circuit. Occasionally referred to as Standing Coasters, but more often as “Standups”. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Station
The building or area where the riders board and depart a roller coaster.
Stator
A general term used for the LIM or LSM blades attached to the track that aluminum (LIM) or rare-earth magnet (LSM) fins under launched coaster cars pass between to accelerate the train forward. A LIM/LSM blade is basically a rotor and stator unrolled into a flat plane.
Steeplechase
An Arrow Special Coaster Systems monorail model that allows guests to ride carousel-like horses in a race against each other. Further information can be found on our Manufacturers page.
Step-Up Under Flip
This RMC element begins with an upward climb, followed by a 270° roll and a dive down towards the side. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Staple
A negative term enthusiasts use to describe the action of a ride op ratcheting (stapling) down a lap bar or other restraint, thereby making the rider uncomfortable and often reducing the sensation of airtime.
Strata Coaster
A roller coaster over 400 feet (122m) tall.
S-Turn
Found on Suspended Coasters (below), this simple track maneuver is designed to swing the ride vehicle to one side and then the other. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Surf Rider
An Intamin variation of their half pipe coaster. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Suspended Coaster
A type of coaster where the train is attached beneath the track, and the cars are mounted on a hinge in order to allow them to freely swing outward left and right. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Swinging Turns
Vekoma‘s family friendly suspended coaster (above). Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Switch Track
As the name suggests, this section of track moves or rotates to connect to one side or the other of two parallel tracks. This element can be found at the entrance and exit of dual loading stations or the entrance of a Switchback station (below). Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Switchback
The original Switchback Railways of the 1800’s had two parallel tracks where the ride vehicle at the end of the outgoing track was pushed over to the return track for the backwards journey to the station (above). The modern Switchback is a single track that the train travels forwards to a vertical spike and then backwards on, before entering a switch track (above) to maneuver back into the station. Further information can be found on our Elements page.

T

Terrain Coaster
A roller coaster that is built in close proximity to and/or around the natural surroundings.
Tester Hill
See Pre-Drop.
Theme Park
A park with themed areas such as Jungles, Safaris, Wild West, Haunted Woods, Roman Gods, and so on.
Threaded Loop
A vertical loop which has a section of track (below) from either the same ride or a different one passing through it.
Thrust Air Coaster
See Air Powered Launch.
Thunderbolt
Named after the famous coaster that used to reside at New York City’s Coney Island, it’s Zamperla‘s large steel multi inverting coaster that fits into a very narrow area. Further information can be found on our Manufacturers page.
Tilt Coaster
A Vekoma coaster where the train (below) is pulled onto a horizontal section of “tilt track”, and secured by a hook and a steel block. The track (below) section then tilts to a vertical position and the train released when the track lines up with a fixed section of track below.
Timberliner Trains
Roller coaster trains (below) designed by Gravity Group and manufactured by Gravitykraft. Timberliners are characterized by their cushioned seats, individual rider lap bars and frontage shaped to represent the ride theme.
Tire Propelled Launch Coasters
These launch coasters use a motorized tire (UK: tyre) to move the train (below) along the track (below). Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Tivoli
Named after their first installation at Tivoli Gardens in Denmark, these Zierer family coasters feature very long trains (below) with a compact layout. Further information can be found on our Manufacturers page.
Togo
A Japanese roller coaster company originally known as Toyo Goraku Ki Kabushiki Kaisha from 1935 to 1983. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
Top Gun Stall
See Zero-G Stall.
Top Hat
Typically found on launched coasters, Top Hats start with a 90° ascent up a hill followed by a 90° descent with the train (below) exiting in the same direction from which it entered. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Topper Track
Created by RMC, Topper Track is a steel replacement that covers the top levels of wooden coaster track (below).
Track
The fixed layout and structural path that the car/train (below) travels on.
Train
Two or more roller coaster cars joined together.
Transfer Track
A movable section of the track (above) that allows cars or trains (above) to be moved on and off the circuit.
Traveling Coaster
A portable roller coaster that can be easily taken apart, transported and rebuilt at multiple locations.
Treble Clef
Named after the music symbol it resembles, it’s a B&M designed turnaround (below) where the train (above) enters a Horseshoe and at the top tilts to a 91° angle before dropping toward the ground. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
T-Rex
RMC‘s T-Rex track (above) is a single rail coaster track, similar to what you would see on a monorail, that allows for longer spans of track, meaning less connections and lower maintenance. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
Trick Hill
See Pre-Drop.
Trick Track
An element on wooden coasters from the 1920’s where a section of track (above) was crooked in order to confuse riders about their direction of travel.
Trim Brake
Usually referred to as “Trims”, it’s a brake positioned somewhere on the track (above) to slow the train (above) down, but does not function as a block brake. These are often added on coasters after they are built to control unexpected or overbearing forces and speed. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Tunnel
Like many roadway or railway tunnels, some roller coasters have ones that go underground. However, most coaster tunnels are structures made of wood or aluminum that the train (above) passes through. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Turnaround
Usually a turn of at least 180° located farthest from the station after which the trains (above) begin their return back to the station. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Twist and Turn Coaster
Intamin’s extremely family friendly spinning coaster with a basic layout that features gentle inclines and a powered train with two-person cars of spinning seats. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Twisted Horseshoe Roll
This element is basically a corkscrew, followed by a 180° banked turn that leads into another corkscrew in the reverse direction. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Twister Coaster
Zamperla‘s term for their Wild Mouse spinning coasters. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.

U

Ultratwister
Often referred to as a Pipeline Coaster, this Togo coaster features a vertical lift hill, a near vertical drop and rolling inversions as its cars sit between the tracks, as opposed to on top or underneath them. Further information can be found on our Manufacturers page.
Upstop Wheels
The wheels on the wheel assembly that are below the track. Further information can be found on our Trains page.

V

Valleying
When a roller coaster train fails to make it over an incline, it “valleys” back and forth until it comes to a complete natural stop at the lowest part of the track.
Vekoma
A Dutch roller coaster company that’s been in operation since 1926. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
Vertical Drop
A drop that goes straight down at a 90° angle.
Vertical Drop Coaster
Zierer‘s version of a dive coaster. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Vertical Loop
A loop that stands straight up at a 90° angle with the ground. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Vertical Spike
Also referred to as a Vertical Rollback, it’s a tall 90° ascent that is used to send the train on a backwards return to the station. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Vertical Spiral
A term used most for the upward spiral on Intamin‘s LIM launched impulse coasters (also called a Twisted Vertical Rollback), but also used for the downward spiral on the company’s strata coasters. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Virtual Coaster
A roller coaster where riders wear a VR (Virtual Reality) headset.
Volare
Zamperla‘s version of a flying coaster. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.

W

Wacky Worm
Also know as a Big Apple or Caterpillar, these kiddie coasters have a figure 8 layout and feature caterpillar themed trains.
Water Coaster
A steel tracked coaster that has many water-based drops and sections similar to those of a log flume.
Water Spout
A visual element encompassing a variety of different methods to simulate a coaster’s interaction with a body of water without the ride vehicle making contact with the water.
Wave Turn
Designed by RMC, it’s basically a 90° banked curve that incorporates a small camelback hill with the train exiting in the opposite direction that it entered. Further information can be found on our Elements page.
Weight Drop Launch
Schwarzkopf‘s early launch system on their shuttle loop coasters, where a cabled weight is dropped inside a vertical spike to propel the train forward. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
WGH
An abbreviation of WGH Transportation, a defunct UK company that built the only “people powered” coaster. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
Wild Mouse
A single car roller coaster with a large flat section of upper track consisting of multiple 180° turnarounds and lower sections of track with a few drops and/or bunny hops.
Wildcat
Schwarzkopf‘s popular portable steel roller coasters with a compact twisting layout that were common at carnivals and fairs from the 1960’s through the 1980’s. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
Wing Coaster
On these coasters riders sit beside the track on “winged” seats, opposed to under or above the track. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Wing Over Drop
See Dive Drop.
Wooden Coaster
Often referred to as a “Woodie”, it’s a roller coaster with track made from wood.

X

X-Car Coaster
Also known as X-Coaster or Xtended Coaster, it’s Maurer‘s most versatile coaster model that are recognized by their train‘s X-Cars with large, individual seats that have an onboard audio option. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
X-Rail
Also known as 4D rails, they’re the secondary rails on 4D coaster track that controls which way the seats flip.

Z

Zac Spin
Referred to early on as a “Ball Coaster”, it’s Intamin‘s version of a 4D coaster that features rotating seats on each side of the track. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Zamperla
The huge Italian amusement attractions company that’s been in business since 1966. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
Zero Car
An axle that can be found at the front or rear of a train to give it support; a car without seats.
Zero-G Roll
This element begins the same as a normal hill, however at the moment where the Zero-G Roll starts, the train begins to flip. The revolution lasts the same amount of time as the Zero-G, creating the sensation of floating and rolling at the same time. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Zero-G Stall
Also referred to as a Top Gun Stall and designed by RMC, the Zero-G Stall is similar to a Zero-G Roll (above), however after the track has twisted 180° on the ascent, it stays inverted through the crest before twisting back on the descent. Also similarly, riders experience a feeling of weightlessness during the inverted crest. Further information can be found on our Inversions page.
Zierer
A German coaster company that’s been in business since 1930. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.
Zig Zag Coaster
Zamperla’s (above) term for their non-spinning Wild Mouse coasters. Further information can be found on our Coaster Types page.
Zyklon
The extremely popular Pinfari compact coasters from the 1960’s through the 1990’s that came in inverting and non-inverting models. The non-inverting model is basically a clone of Schwarzkopf‘s Wildcat coasters. Further information can be found on our Manufacturer page.