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Silver Dollar City | Time Traveler | Mack Looping Launched Spinner

Swoosh

Member
I, for one, am glad that this is a spinner as Ive always been intrigued about how spinning messes around with the forces of an inversion like what is on this ride.

Granted I love any type of amusement attraction that spins. Now, is this a forced spin like that of some of their spinners, or will it be free/"encouraged" spinning (encouraged meaning it helps to get the car to spin without it feeling like a program)?

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The way they explained it at the media event is that it is a free spin with a magnetic throttle. So if you off balance your car it will spin faster to a point. When the on board sensor determines the car is spinning too fast more friction will be applied between the magnetic plate and the fins on the cart. I hope my explanation made sense.
 

DelPiero

Well-Known Member
The way they explained it at the media event is that it is a free spin with a magnetic throttle. So if you off balance your car it will spin faster to a point. When the on board sensor determines the car is spinning too fast more friction will be applied between the magnetic plate and the fins on the cart. I hope my explanation made sense.
Does that also apply to if the car is potentially perfectly weighted and there isn't enough spinning, does it throttle up and maintain a minimum spin?
 

Hixee

Flojector
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Oh boy, I can't say I like the idea of the spinning being "trimmed". Hopefully it's to stop really intense spinning, but I worry they'll kill any serious momentum that the spinning could build. Fingers crossed!

Does that also apply to if the car is potentially perfectly weighted and there isn't enough spinning, does it throttle up and maintain a minimum spin?
I somehow doubt that? I feel like it would be a bit awkward to control, and possibly make the ride feel a bit strange (read: ****). Would be a cool idea if they could encourage spinning at certain spots of the ride though!
 

Swoosh

Member
Since this is a completely new design for Mack I imagine it'll have to go through a lot of tweaking on how much (or little) friction will be applied. It will be interesting to see how noticeable it is to riders.
 

Jarrett

Most Obnoxious Member 2016
The way I understand this mechanism:

*The ride has an onboard rev counter that can tell how fast it's spinning.
*If it spins too fast, it sends a signal which clicks on an electromagnet.
*This electromagnet attracts a friction plate to itself, which exerts force and slows the spin considerably.

Correct? It honestly doesn't seem that complicated.
 

Ireeb

Member
The way I understand this mechanism:

*The ride has an onboard rev counter that can tell how fast it's spinning.
*If it spins too fast, it sends a signal which clicks on an electromagnet.
*This electromagnet attracts a friction plate to itself, which exerts force and slows the spin considerably.

Correct? It honestly doesn't seem that complicated.
It could also be magnetic brake without friction. I think it is more likely, a friction based system would probably brake too hard/be too noticable.
 

Swoosh

Member
It could also be magnetic brake without friction. I think it is more likely, a friction based system would probably brake too hard/be too noticable.
I'm not sure the are using the word "friction" in the literal sense, but I agree with you that if they are it could be too hard.
 

Ireeb

Member
I'm not sure the are using the word "friction" in the literal sense, but I agree with you that if they are it could be too hard.
It would probably no problem to build a ring-shaped eddy current brake in there. It would have the advantage that it brakes harder if it spins faster, and less if it spins slower. That way you would barely notice it kicking in. It would have the further advantage that it would need no/less maintenance, if there was really friction in there, they would have to service that part regularly.
 
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Hixee

Flojector
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
It would probably no problem to build a ring-shaped eddy current brake in there. It would have the advantage that it brakes harder if it spins faster, and less if it spins slower. That way you would barely notice it kicking in. It would have the further advantage that it would need no/less maintenance, if there was really friction in there, they would have to service that part regularly.
If I worked for Mack, and had been tasked with this problem, that would have been design idea #1. Sounds like a workable, simple, well understood system requiring little maintenance and would give a smooth rider experience.
 
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Hixee

Flojector
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
I rather like the extra buildings/shelters on the bridge.
 

Swoosh

Member
So is that the vertical transfer track?
Yep. It seems that intel was incorrect. I know you haven't been following this thread too faithfully, but we had already confirmed this fact back before the park officially announced the ride. Welcome to mid-August, Ben.
 

Hyde

I Lied About My Age!
Staff member
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If the completion of this construction means less bickering from you two - boy am I happy.
 
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