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What makes the Mack E-Motion Coaster different from a regular wild mouse coaster?

Matt N

Well-Known Member
Hi guys. Out of all of the models that Mack Rides has ever debuted, the E-Motion Coaster is perhaps one of the most intriguing to me. Only 2 of them were ever built, but the reason why I created this thread was to ask; what is actually different about the E-Motion Coaster to a regular wild mouse coaster besides a slightly different car design? I've never been entirely sure, as the two that have been built are very different rides to one another; Reaper at Amsterdam Dungeon had lots of moving parts and almost looked like a budget version of Gringotts, whereas Tulireki at Linnanmaki looks more like Mack's take on the Gerstlauer Bobsled Coaster. Does anyone know any more about what the differentiating factors between the E-Motion Coaster and Mack's regular wild mouse model, which has been far more popular?

I'd also be rather intrigued to know why they only built two of them, but that's a story for another thread!
 

JoshC.

Active Member
I can't give a detailed analysis of the differences, but basically the e-motion cars effectively have springs underneath them (presumably on the sides towards the back). So, when the car turns, it will lean on the springs, causing it to bounce. At a guess, I'd imagine there's less possible space between the track and the wheels, so that the car instead leans on the springs rather than the wheels, meaning the bounce is possible. I haven't seen any clearcut photos of chassises or anything to be certain, but that's definitely how the car feels.

The trouble is that, to create a comfortable ride experience, you can't have the cars 'lean' too much (otherwise it'll be rough). So the leaning factor is very neutered, meaning you hardly notice it on wild mouse turns. But then throughout any layout, there will still be some sort of natural shifting of the car, causing a bounce in awkward places. This is why the ride type never took off - you can't get the desired tilting effect without creating a bad ride.
 

Matt N

Well-Known Member
I can't give a detailed analysis of the differences, but basically the e-motion cars effectively have springs underneath them (presumably on the sides towards the back). So, when the car turns, it will lean on the springs, causing it to bounce. At a guess, I'd imagine there's less possible space between the track and the wheels, so that the car instead leans on the springs rather than the wheels, meaning the bounce is possible. I haven't seen any clearcut photos of chassises or anything to be certain, but that's definitely how the car feels.

The trouble is that, to create a comfortable ride experience, you can't have the cars 'lean' too much (otherwise it'll be rough). So the leaning factor is very neutered, meaning you hardly notice it on wild mouse turns. But then throughout any layout, there will still be some sort of natural shifting of the car, causing a bounce in awkward places. This is why the ride type never took off - you can't get the desired tilting effect without creating a bad ride.
Ah right. Thanks for the info @JoshC.!
 

PetskuC

Member
As someone whose homepark is Linnanmäki, let me tell ya something: Tulireki sucks. Yeah, the wild mouse type turns are just that: wild mouse-style turns with high laterals. As stated above, you need to have a bad layout to get the springs to work.

The first large drop is a prime example of this. It is not straight like a regular wild mouse, but features some kinks and bumps in it, making the whole train jump up and down, as well as shaking. That turn feels like a bad wooden coaster. I don't like it one bit.

Feel free to ask more questions regarding the e-motion coaster. All my wild mouse references are to Vilda Musen at Gröna Lund, which is the only wild mouse I have ridden.

Sent from my ONEPLUS A6013 using Tapatalk
 

Matt N

Well-Known Member
As someone whose homepark is Linnanmäki, let me tell ya something: Tulireki sucks. Yeah, the wild mouse type turns are just that: wild mouse-style turns with high laterals. As stated above, you need to have a bad layout to get the springs to work.

The first large drop is a prime example of this. It is not straight like a regular wild mouse, but features some kinks and bumps in it, making the whole train jump up and down, as well as shaking. That turn feels like a bad wooden coaster. I don't like it one bit.

Feel free to ask more questions regarding the e-motion coaster. All my wild mouse references are to Vilda Musen at Gröna Lund, which is the only wild mouse I have ridden.

Sent from my ONEPLUS A6013 using Tapatalk
Out of interest, is it known whether these kinks were intentional, or were they accidental? As Mack's newer work seems to imply that they can build very smooth coasters?
 

Ethan

Well-Known Member
Am I right in thinking the coaster at the Amsterdam Dungeons was an E Motion coaster, too? They look a bit poo tbh.
 

Coastard69

New Member
Reaper, was a very interesting ride. Not very good or memorable (especially considering the Amsterdam Dungeon experience around it). I think was the E-motion was Mack in a not very innovative period trying to find something new to sell.
 
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