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Six Flags park announced in Saudi Arabia

redheadedRobin

Roller Poster
The guy is also a "high ranking member of the Saudi Foreign Ministry". Of course he's going to say this. It's like me asking Jeff Bezos if he recommends getting an Amazon Prime account.


Yeah, not really selling it for me tbh ;) Why would I want to visit a place in which I must hide a large part of my identity, a part which can't be changed, just to avoid violence or prosecution?


And there's the thing. I ain't spending my hard-earned tourism pennies to fund a nation that treats it's citizens in this way. Not saying you're a fundamentally flawed person for visiting, but it wouldn't sit right with me. I know there's not really such thing as an ethical purchase under capitalism, most transactions will fund something bad and there's not much you can do about it. However, it's pretty easy to not visit a country that's as backwards as Saudi Arabia, so I feel that me not visiting is the right thing for me to do.


I'm all for following the rules when on holiday. However in a normal country, the rules are things like "don't be drunk and disorderly" or "drive with your headlights on 24/7".

But I mean, if you wanna go on an expensive holiday with no sex or even alcohol, you're free to do so! I'll stick to places where I can have a beer and hold a bloke's hand without getting locked up :)

As @Stevie said, on point 👌
 

ChristianPalsson

Hyper Poster
The guy is also a "high ranking member of the Saudi Foreign Ministry". Of course he's going to say this. It's like me asking Jeff Bezos if he recommends getting an Amazon Prime account.

Ofcource he will do everything to sell his country, that's his job, but he gave me his card and told me to call him when I visit. Overall he seemed like a genuine guy.

I fully respect the choice to not visit these types of countries. My dad also refuses to join me when I go to the UAE, Israel, Cuba, etc for similar reasons. Personally, I believe in visiting new places to experience what they have to offer and see their culture. Even if I dont agree with it. I always think it's the people themselves who shall create and demand change, not foreigners. My only choices are to either visit or not visit. Both are perfectly honorable choices. The problem is just that when refusing to visit places on ethical grounds you mostly don't have any place to go on earth.

Maybe one day I will be able to be in Saudi, watching the red sea sunset with a beer in one hand and a bloke's shaft in the other. That day might one day come. Untill then my straight acting skills are pretty good.

On an other note. I am also quite baffled by Saudi Arabia's push for the "mass market" tourism segment. With these kinds of restrictions that will be difficult. Only the ultra luxury and niche segments would work.
 

Ethan

Strata Poster
Personally, I believe in visiting new places to experience what they have to offer and see their culture. Even if I dont agree with it. I always think it's the people themselves who shall create and demand change, not foreigners.
Pretty hard for them to do in Saudi Arabia, where even peaceful demonstrations are forbidden and lead to awful punishment.

The problem is just that when refusing to visit places on ethical grounds you mostly don't have any place to go on earth.
I agree that any place you visit will have flaws and laws you may not agree with, even my own country has them. But I would be careful with this, as some countries are objectively worse than others. It's like when people refuse to vote because "all politicians are as bad as each other". That's simply not true, there are dangerous people out there. Italy, for example, hasn't legalised gay marriage, but I can easily visit there knowing that I will not be punished for being myself. Saudi Arabia is not like this, not all countries are equal.
 
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