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Liseberg | Valkyria | B&M Dive Coaster

MLDesigns

Hyper Poster
So glad construction is picking back up. I'm visiting the park for the first time in mid-July and I though all hope for riding this was long gone. It'll be really close!
 

CSLKennyNI

Giga Poster
IMG_20180522_155942.jpg

Bottom of the drop going in.
From Andreas Andersen's Twitter.
 
The drop has now been assembled and all that remains of the track is the Immelman which probably will be done next week. I will be going to Liseberg this Wednesday and hopefully get som nice pictures of the fully assembled coaster!
 

streetmagix

Mega Poster
Awesome pictures! I assume it's just the track left to go now? The station and queue line looks finished but I haven't seen any close-up pictures of them recently. What's the average test length for a B&M nowadays?
 

Matt N

Strata Poster
What's the average test length for a B&M nowadays?
I believe B&M like to test their coasters for about 2 months, at least. Mako's first test run was on 14th April 2016 and it opened on 10th June 2016, and The Swarm's first test run was on 17th January 2012 and it opened on 15th March 2012. Those are two I can give a perspective on, if that helps at all. All I can conclusively say is that B&M aren't one of these manufacturers who only tests the ride for a very short period, like companies such as Gerstlauer and sometimes RMC do.
 

Jared

Hyper Poster
Usually, depending on the local health and safety rules, rides need to run for 1000 hours before being loaded with passengers. It’s not normally date or timeframe specific, as long as it does it’s number of hours it’s allowed to operate.

So for example, they could run the ride 1000 hours straight and tick it off in a few weeks, but I think it’s park / locality dependant.
 

Matt N

Strata Poster
Usually, depending on the local health and safety rules, rides need to run for 1000 hours before being loaded with passengers. It’s not normally date or timeframe specific, as long as it does it’s number of hours it’s allowed to operate.

So for example, they could run the ride 1000 hours straight and tick it off in a few weeks, but I think it’s park / locality dependant.
Ah right. So it's number of hours and not number of days. Thanks @Jared!
 

Ben

Social Media Team
Social Media Team
1000 hours is 41 days consecutively, non-stop... it's not 1000 hours as there's less than that until Fenix opens and that hasn't even started testing.
 

TMCoasters

Mega Poster
Based on the two month time frame of testing it is on track to open in early August, but I would imagine they'll speed up the testing phase due to the past delays. I'll be there in the beginning-middle of August so hopefully it's open by late July and the hype will have died down a bit when I go.
 

Pokemaniac

Mountain monkey
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Working at a university has many benefits. One of them is that you get access to international standardization documents. And I managed to dig up a copy of "EN 13814: Fairground and amusement park machinery and structures, Safety". It actually doesn't require a specific number of hours of testing (or number of cycles, for that matter), but it does require a whole lot of different load combinations to be tested before the ride is allowed to open. Maybe local laws have time requirements before the ride is approved, but I really doubt it. After all, how much testing you get out of, say, 1000 hours depends entirely on the ride's cycle time.
 
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