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Phewey

New Member
Does anyone read comics?If so what type?Which are your favorite heroes?
I collect disney comics and love uncle scrooge.
 

Pokemaniac

Mountain monkey
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Phewey said:
I collect disney comics and love uncle scrooge.
Same.

For thirteen years now, I've collected the weekly Donald Duck magazine. I have also collected Donald Pocket books for eleven years (coming out monthly), in total forming a respectable stack of about 200 books (that's three meters or so) And I've read everything several times.

I also have versions of the magazine from about 20-25 countries, including Greece, China, Russia and the United Arab Emirates.

All-time favourite? After reading for those 13 years, I picked up a copy of The Life and Times of Scrooge McDuck a few months ago. It's basically a summary of Scrooge's life, containing tons of references to other stories. In fact, nothing major happens in the story, that hasn't already been told by Carl Barks himself (like Scrooge saying "I bought this for 22 pence in Scotland in 1934", or "When I was selling sand to the Egyptians in 1915..."). I was almost in tears at times, the stories bringing back so many memories.

Funnily enough, the Donald Duck/Mickey Mouse magazine has been discontinued in nearly all English-speaking countries. For some weird reason, they don't sell it in the UK, nor USA.

Last, a fun fact. In the USA, a comic is considered successful if it has 30,000 weekly readers. In Norway, the Donald Duck magazine has 1,1 million readers every week. If a comic should sell as well in the USA as here in Scandinavia, they would need about 60-80 million readers every week. That is as much as the average "successful" comic would (theoretically) sell in 40 years.
 

MouseAT

Active Member
I'm not a huge comic fan, but I'm certainly open to reading some of the darker, more adult content from the likes of Warren Ellis and Alan Moore.

I currently own the full set of Transmetropolitan graphic novels which are extremely dark, often offensive yet thought provoking and hilariously funny.

I also picked up the V for Vendetta graphic novel last year, and I have to say I'm extremely impressed with Alan Moore's work. There's very little humour to be found in that one - just very clever storytelling.

I'm tempted to pick up some of Ellis and Moore's other work, namely The Authority and Watchmen, as I've heard great things about them, but it's really just a case of having the motivation to part with the cash to buy them.

I also read two web comics on a regular basis. User Friendly is one for the IT geeks and has been running pretty much every day for the last ten years. Order of the Stick is for the role-playing geeks, and is updated less frequently (around once a week I believe). Both are hilarious if you get the humour behind them, otherwise you'll probably hate them.
 

the_missus

Member
I use to collect some of the X-Men comics....can't even remember which ones, they're stored away atm. I also started collecting comic caled Little Red Hot Bound but they only did about 4/5 of them....hmmmn maybe they've done some more..might have to check that out!!

But don't really buy them anymore. One of my mates got me an X-Men Graphic Novel a coulpe of years ago which was ace!

I do want to read The Watchmen after seeing the film, I did buy it for someone...so might have to sneakily borrow it!!
 

mrclam

Active Member
Buy the bone books .. they're fab!

(or get the whole huge novel)

The novel (containing all the books) is available in black ink. He's just finished the proicess of colouring in each book.. taken him 2 years. .. I couldve done it in 5 minutes and not gone out of the lines or anything...

Random collection of images from the comics (dont try to follow them or anything - as they're random)






http://www.boneville.com/

buy them black and white in one big volume which'll take you a while to read (if you're like me and like to study the artwork of each frame as well as read the story):

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bone-One-collec ... 527&sr=8-5


or get the first 3 books coloured in:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bone-Boneville- ... 606&sr=1-4
 

Error

Well-Known Member
^That looks quite amazing.

I read Watchmen recently, but I'm not too into comic books. I'm all for the animations :)
 

mrclam

Active Member
Error said:
^That looks quite amazing.
It is!

It's one of my most favorite books - re-read numerous times.. considering buying the coloured in version...

Imagine lord of the rings style expansive story, in a fictional fantasy world, mainly inhabbited by human types.. Except for 3 lost cartoony looking bone characters..

Good mixture of comic book humour and expansive fantasy story telling.
 

Phewey

New Member
1.(posted by Pokemaniac)All-time favourite? After reading for those 13 years, I picked up a copy of The Life and Times of Scrooge McDuck a few months ago. It's basically a summary of Scrooge's life, containing tons of references to other stories. In fact, nothing major happens in the story, that hasn't already been told by Carl Barks himself (like Scrooge saying "I bought this for 22 pence in Scotland in 1934", or "When I was selling sand to the Egyptians in 1915..."). I was almost in tears at times, the stories bringing back so many memories.

Well the concept of little Scrooge cleaning Dick's boots wasnt Bark's but Tony Stroble's(i dont know i f i wrote it correctly

2.(for mrclam)I heard that Bone got an Eisner award...is it that good?
 

mrclam

Active Member
Id probably get the whole lot.. As the fantasy side of the story doesnt really "kick in" until the 3rd book..

But the first 2 books are a silly intro to the characters..

The books start out more cartoony and get more "mature" throughout the series.. Which is understandable considering how long it took him to make them all! THIRTEEN years in total for the original books.. plus 3 years for the coloured in versions..

So SIXTEEN (?!?) years to make them all... So he made them with understanding that his readership was getting older as he made them...

Personally I think - if you can get the One volume large edition (1300 pages!) it's well worth it!

Read it before it gets ruined by the Warner bros movie...
 

Harvey

Member
Try the Sandman stories by Neil Gaiman, top stuff for many reasons I don't feel inclined to list, but yeah, good stuff.
 

Ben

Social Media Team
Social Media Team
Alan Moore lives in Northampton, on the same street as my cousin.


Here ends my knowledge on the subject.
 

Phewey

New Member
Anyway, i think that the life and times of Scroog mc Duck is the winner!I love that comic book!It's fun but moving too...If only designers followed Rosas's example...
 

Pokemaniac

Mountain monkey
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
^Though, it's adviced to read a great deal of Donald Duck classics before you start reading. Carl Barks is regarded by many as the best storyteller of the 20th century, I can really only see one competitor. So pick up some issues (oh wait, you don't have them...), and start reading. After a few hundred stories by Barks and Strobl, go on to Life and Times. I was nearly crying when I read it.

Awesome.
 

MouseAT

Active Member
Harvey said:
Try the Sandman stories by Neil Gaiman, top stuff for many reasons I don't feel inclined to list, but yeah, good stuff.
Ah yes, I'd forgotten about Sandman. That one's been highly recommended to me a couple of times already. One to add to the list of graphic novels to maybe buy sometime before I die.
 

mrclam

Active Member
I finished reading "League of Extraordinary Gentlemen" last night.

Nothing like the crppy movie.

.. totally not suitable for kiddywinks.
 
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